övning

25/03/2019

På bussen til Oslo. Sykkelen ligger demontert i egen koffert under bussen. Selv sitter jeg litt bak i bussen, i setet mot midtgangen. Det er første forsvarslinje for å ha en seterad alene.

Vindussetet er fylt av aviser, en termos kaffe og sjokolade. Melkesjokolade, rent og enkelt. I tillegg har jeg det ene benet over det andre og sitter litt innovervendt slik at om noen tenker å spør om plass ved siden av meg skal de se at det vil medføre ihvertfall litt bry. Siden det er en torsdag og det antakelig går nok busser aliekvel blir jeg sittende alene fra Lillesand til Oslo.
Jeg liker å ta buss, har jo tatt buss hele livet egentlig. Buss til skole, buss fra skole. Buss til Byen (som var Kristiansand) og buss til og fra jobb. Men å sitteI tillegg har jeg det ene benet over det andre og sitter litt innovervendt slik at om noen tenker å spør om plass ved siden av meg skal de se at det vil medføre ihvertfall litt bry. Siden det er en torsdag og det antakelig går nok busser aliekvel blir jeg sittende alene fra Lillesand til Oslo.
Jeg liker å ta buss, har jo tatt buss hele livet egentlig. Buss til skole, buss fra skole. Buss til Byen (som var Kristiansand) og buss til og fra jobb. Men å sitteI tillegg har jeg det ene benet over det andre og sitter litt innovervendt slik at om noen tenker å spør om plass ved siden av meg skal de se at det vil medføre ihvertfall litt bry. Siden det er en torsdag og det antakelig går nok busser aliekvel blir jeg sittende alene fra Lillesand til Oslo.
Jeg liker å ta buss, har jo tatt buss hele livet egentlig. Buss til skole, buss fra skole. Buss til Byen (som var Kristiansand) og buss til og fra jobb. Men å sitteI tillegg har jeg det ene benet over det andre og sitter litt innovervendt slik at om noen tenker å spør om plass ved siden av meg.

Skal de se at det vil medføre ihvertfall litt bry. Siden det er en torsdag og det antakelig går nok busser aliekvel blir jeg sittende alene fra Lillesand til Oslo. Jeg liker å ta buss, har jo tatt buss hele livet egentlig. Buss til skole, buss fra skole. Buss til Byen (som var Kristiansand) og buss til og fra jobb. Men å sitte

Screen-detox

21/03/2019

At smartmobilen tar mye av tiden vår er vel udiskutabelt. Jeg trodde ikke jeg var så verst til å styre meg. Det var før jeg har lot funksjonen Skjermtid på iPhonen min overvåke hvor mange timer jeg bruker den hver dag. Samtidig registreres hvor mange ganger du løfter den opp i løpet av en dag.

At iPhonen inneholder omtrent ALT er selvsagt en årsåk til så mye bruk:

Avisene jeg abonnerer på (New York Times, Washinton Post, Die Zeit, DN, The Guardian) nyhetssidene som MÅ sjekkes, Instagram - hvor jeg dyrker sykkelinteressen, Twitter - hvor jeg følger syklister, forfattere og utvalgte spennende folk, Kalender som også funker som en to-do app, E-post, TV-serier lastet ned på iPhonen så jeg kan se på noe om jeg skulle trenge å døyve tiden uten internettforbindelse, Podcast appen med alle podcastene jeg abonnerer på (hvor mange får jeg egentlig hørt på?), Things, min getting-things-done app som funker såå bra. Alle bilder og all video, Kart, Dropbox og Filer hvor jeg lagrer og synkroniserer alt fra webdesign-elementer til treningsprogram og masse grafikk. Music - med all musikken jeg elsker, alle radioappene jeg liker (DR, Sveriges Radio, NRK) - listen er sikkert lenger. I tillegg kommer apper for streaming av TV-serier og filmer, Netflix, HBO, Get osv.

Skyer

ianfisher.jpg

Ian Fishers ultra-realistiske oljemalerier av skyer er utrolige! Når du blar gjennom bildene på hjemmesiden hans kan du se progresjonen i teknikken hans; de siste bildene ser mer ut som fotografi enn oljemalerier.

Algoritmekunst

11/03/2019
algoritmekunst.jpg

Dimitris Ladopoulos har lagd en algoritme som gjenskaper klassiske kunstverk digitalt. Best forklart av ham selv;

I have always been inspired by both the arts and technology, so I wanted to experiment with a contemporary view of old masters’ paintings. Inspired by information visualisation methods called ‘Treemapping’, I created an algorithm that takes a painting and subdivides it based on the density of information of the original painting. The more information there is the on the original, the more it is subdivided and thus the smaller the rectangle elements. The less information, the larger the rectangle area. You could say there is a similarity to the painters’ approach of using broader and finer strokes. The result is a mosaic of rectangles that highlight the subtle changes in the colour palette of the original.

 

* Utsnittet over er fra Rembrandts "Portrait of Rosalba" (Rembrandts datter)
Flere prosjekter av Ladopoulus → 

Illustrert

09/03/2019
EikoOjala19_02.gif

New Zealand and Estonia-based illustrator Eiko Ojala (previously) creates cut paper illustrations that present shadow and depth through creative layering of colorful pieces of paper.

Recently, his editorial illustrations have been focused on the mind and body, like a cut paper GIF he created for a story on heart attacks in the New York Times. Others, like two Washington Post illustrations, attempt to uncover the thoughts and feelings sequestered in children’s minds by layering images inside the shape of a boy’s profile. You can see more of Ojala’s designs on his Instagram and Behance.

Havnivå

08/03/2019
lines3.jpeg

By use of sensors, the installation interacts with the rising tidal changes; activating on high tide. The work provides a visual reference of future sea level rise

The installation explores the catastrophic impact of our relationship with nature and its long term effects. The work provokes a dialogue on how the rising sea levels will affect coastal areas, its inhabitants and land usage in the future.

This is specifically relevant in the low lying island archipelago of Uist in the Outer Hebrides off the west coast of Scotland, and in particular to Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum & Arts Centre in Lochmaddy where the installation is situated. The centre cannot develop on its existing site due to predicted storm surge sea levels.

HJEMMESIDEN FOR INSTALLASJONEN

THE art thief

05/03/2019

“Don't worry about parking the car,” says the art thief. “Anywhere near the museum is fine.” When it comes to stealing from museums, Stéphane Breitwieser is virtually peerless. He is one of the most prolific and successful art thieves who have ever lived. Done right, his technique—daytime, no violence, performed like a magic trick, sometimes with guards in the room—never involves a dash to a getaway car. And done wrong, a parking spot is the least of his worries.

Just make sure to get there at lunchtime, Breitwieser stresses, when the visitors thin and the security staff rotates shorthanded to eat. Dress sharply, shoes to shirt, topped by a jacket that's tailored a little too roomy, with a Swiss Army knife stashed in a pocket.

Be friendly at the front desk. Buy your ticket, say hello. Once inside, Breitwieser adds, it's essential to focus. Note the flow of visitor traffic and memorize the exits. Count the guards. Are they sitting or patrolling? Check for security cameras and see if each has a wire—sometimes they're fake.

WATCH

10 Things The Chainsmokers Can't Live Without

When it comes to museum flooring, creaky old wood is ideal, so even with his back turned, Breitwieser can hear footsteps two rooms away. Carpeting is the worst. Here, at the Rubens House, in Antwerp, Belgium, it's somewhere in between: marble. For this theft, Breitwieser has arrived with his girlfriend and frequent travel companion, Anne-Catherine Kleinklaus, who positions herself near the only doorway to a ground-floor exhibition room and coughs softly when anyone approaches.

The Rubens House in Antwerp. The site of one of Breitwieser's more memorable heists.

Mark Renders/Getty Images

The museum is the former home of Peter Paul Rubens, the great Flemish painter of the 1600s. Breitwieser isn't interested in stealing a Rubens; his paintings tend to be extremely large or too overtly religious for Breitwieser's taste. What sets Breitwieser apart from nearly every other art thief—it's the trait, he believes, that has facilitated his prowess—is that he will steal only pieces that stir him emotionally. And he insists that he never sells any. Stealing art for money, he says, is stupid. Money can be made with far less risk. But stealing for love, Breitwieser knows, is ecstatic.

And this piece, right in front of him, is a marvel. He had discovered it during a visit to the museum two weeks previous. He wasn't able to take it then, but its image blazed in his mind every time he sought sleep. This is why he's returned; this has happened before. There will be no good rest until the object is his.

It's an ivory sculpture of Adam and Eve, carved in 1627 by Georg Petel, a friend of Reubens's, who, according to Breitwieser, gifted him the piece for his 50th birthday. The carving is a masterpiece, just ten inches tall but dazzlingly detailed, the first humans gazing at each other as they move to embrace, Eve's hair scrolling down her back, the serpent coiled around the tree trunk behind them, and the unbitten apple, cheekily, in Adam's hand, indicating his complicity in the fall of man, contrary to the book of Genesis. “It's the most beautiful object I have ever seen,” says Breitwieser.

Georg Petel’s ivory sculpture of Adam and Eve, stolen from—and later returned to—the museum at the home of Peter Paul Rubens in Antwerp.

Dystopi

03/03/2019
robert-darch-the-moor-02+%281%29.jpg

My first conscious memory was the sound of hunting dogs baying on the fringes of Dartmoor,’ says photographer Robert Darch, who recently launched his new book at the Martin Parr Foundation. ‘Although our 1960s semi backed onto fields, the rurality of Devon and the baying hounds must have appeared otherworldly to me as a three-year-old.’

That mystical feeling has stayed with Darch, and it permeates the pages of The Moor, a sci-fi visual narrative that shows the landscape as a dystopia in the near future. Dark, tense and perilous, Dartmoor is turned into a dramatic stage setting, primal and symbolic. As an adult, Darch found himself living in the area, moving closer and closer to the moor, drawn there as if by some uncanny force.

It’s the ambivalence of the bleak and barren landscape that Darch clearly finds so fascinating and that has continued to capture his imagination. ‘The moors can appear serene and beautiful on a summer’s day, but during the winter, covered in snow, fog, battered by high winds and stinging rain you can lose yourself in the landscape,’ he explains.

Om søvn

12/02/2019

On the Health Benefits of Sleep

posted by Jason Kottke   Feb 11, 2019

In this piece for The Guardian, Matthew Walker says that sleeping well is the best thing you can do for your health. Here are just a couple of examples:

Routinely sleeping less than six hours a night also compromises your immune system, significantly increasing your risk of cancer. So much so, that recently the World Health Organization classified any form of night-time shiftwork as a probable carcinogen.

Inadequate sleep — even moderate reductions of two to three hours for just one week — disrupts blood sugar levels so profoundly that you would be classified as pre-diabetic. Short sleeping increases the likelihood of your coronary arteries becoming blocked and brittle, setting you on a path towards cardiovascular disease, stroke and congestive heart failure.

A lack of sleep may also increase your chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease, decrease your athletic performance, make it more difficult to control your appetite, and have mental health consequences. Walker, who is the director of UC Berkeley’s Center for Human Sleep Science and author of Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams, says we should change our cultural attitudes towards sleep.

I believe it is therefore time for us, as individuals and as nations, to reclaim our right to a full night of sleep, without embarrassment or the terrible stigma of laziness. I fully understand that this prescription of which I write requires a shift in our cultural, professional, and global appreciation of sleep.

In my media diet roundup post for 2018, I said that getting adequate sleep has “transformed my life” and that sleep is “even lower-hanging self-help fruit than yoga or meditation”. I have not been sleeping well for the past several weeks and it’s taking a toll: I’ve been sluggish, eating poorly & erratically, feeling down, and not anywhere near my peak mental performance. This morning I woke up at 4am, couldn’t really get back to sleep, and I feel like I’m running at 60% capacity, 65% tops.

let it be - dokumentert

31/01/2019
let+it+be.jpg

Peter Jackson (Ringenes Herre m.m.) har fått 55 timer film og 144 timer lyd til rådighet og skal lage en dokumentar om tilblivelsen av The Beatles siste plate, Let it be.

The Guardian